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This little light of mine

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"This little light of mine, I'm gonna let it shine" (Harry Dixon Loes, ca. 1920's) ... a tune I heard on the radio as I was preparing this post.

OKLAHOMA CITY – To say the past four or five weeks have been weird, would be the proverbial understatement of the year. At least for me.

For several weeks in October, the word “love” was coming up a lot, particularly (I thought) in reference to the 60’s rock band led by the enigmatic Arthur Lee.

However, just two days before Halloween, a beloved family member, whose name included the word “Love,” passed away outside of Denver, Colorado.

I had been meaning to visit this family member, who had been so good to me and my family, but I failed to make the trip, until after their death.

That was October 29, 2019. Within two days, specifically Halloween morning, I was “Workin’ on a mystery,” as it were. The focus seemed to be on the singer/songwriter/musician Robbie Robertson, of the group The Band, who are known for such songs as “The Weight,” “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and “Up On Cripple Creek.”

In the dream I am looking at a “red book” about Robbie Robertson, who was apparently dead, according to the dream, but “I kept telling myself – presumably my present self – that Robbie Robertson was very much alive.” In fact, as I would discover later that day, not only was Robertson alive, but he was very active in music, working with longtime collaborator, director Martin Scorsese, on The Irishman and plans to work on Killers of the Flower Moon, a film to be made here in Oklahoma next year (based on David Grann’s book) and Scorsese directing. A family member was looking to be an extra in the film. That remains to be seen, though. 

Anyway, this dream led me to re-examine Robertson’s work with The Band, Scorsese and his solo stuff, including his 2011 album How To Become Clairvoyant. I was getting all sorts of signs this strange autumn. I would go to places and end up in places I never expected to end up in. And it all seemed to be linked to The Shining story. My light seemed to be attracting this shine. The "shine" John Lennon sings about in "Instant Karma!

And a lot seemed to be pointing to Boulder, Colorado. It is the college town where the Torrance family lives before moving to the Overlook Hotel. It is where a unique church exterior was used as the church in the 2002 film About Schmidt, directed by Omaha native Alexander Payne. Jack Nicholson stars in both films, as I noted in "Schmidt shining," a recent Dust Devil Dreams post. I would visit that church. I would also go to the Kensington Apartments in Boulder that acted as the exterior shots Kubrick shot for the apartment building the Torrances lived in. And Nicholson's Warren Schmidt attends his daughter's wedding in Denver, in About Schmidt, but the church shown is in Boulder. 

Two Boulder syncs and both linking Jack Nicholson. That shot of him in the tuxedo in 1921 at the Overlook's July 4th ball is interesting in that Warren Schmidt wears a similar tuxedo in the wedding scene in About Schmidt. The image is the main image collage accompanying this post.

UNDER/OVERLOOK

Anyway, over the course of November, The Shining re-entered my life in a major way. I will be addressing how and why in more depth in a subsequent post ... and possibly a book, if the fates will have it. 

Yes, over the course of November 2019, there was so much happening that was Shining-related. I read The Shining novel by Stephen King, inspired by his stay at The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado in late September 1974.

I discovered a lot I had not known before about the story. It is important to read the novel if you are to fully understand Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece.

I also read King’s 2013 novel Doctor Sleep (the Mike Flanagan film, Doctor Sleep, which was released in November 2019, would be viewed by me in a suburban Boulder movie theater), which begins with the following line in the first chapter: “On the second day of December in a year when a Georgia peanut farmer was doing business in the White House, one of Colorado’s great resort hotels burned to the ground.

While The Shining novel was released in January 1977, King is essentially saying that Jimmy Carter, elected in November 1976, and was in the White House as of December 2nd1977.

That would be exactly 42 years … today.

Again, I have much more to share on this thread of synchromystic thinking. A lot has happened and a lot still has to be written down. In fact, in church yesterday, I was doodling a picture of the Overlook Hotel, with the Rocky Mountains in the background ... snowcapped peaks (!!!) ... and during the homily, as I finish doodling this image I felt a compulsion to draw, he began to talk about the difficulty of reaching the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and the snowcapped peaks. It was simply too utterly bizarre!!!

Again, more to follow! Big changes are coming to this world and we are starting to see the signs. I truly believe that!

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About the Author

Andrew W. Griffin

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Andrew W. Griffin received his Bachelor of Science in Journalism from...

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About Red Dirt Report

Red Dirt Report was launched July 4, 2007 as an independent news website covering all manner of news, culture, entertainment and lifestyle stories that affect and interest Oklahoma readers and readers outside of our state. Our mission is to educate, promote civic engagement and discourse on public policy, government and politics. Our experienced journalists provided balanced in-depth coverage of news stories that affect Oklahomans. Our opinion/editorial stories come from a wide range of political view points. We carry out our mission by reporting, writing, and posting news and information. read more

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